www.dailymail.co.uk

www.dailymail.co.uk

 

Angelo Mastropietro decided to take a man-cave to a WHOLE new level. During one afternoon bike ride he was caught in a rainstorm, took refuge in a cave, and fell in love with it. He purchased it 10 years later. The inspiration to build this luxury cave-home came when he received the devastating news that he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2007. As many people do when they face life-altering news, Mastropietro decided to rethink his priorities and start living life for himself.

He did what many of us dream to do: he fled into the hills and created a little home outside of the stress and tension of modern-day life. The cave sits in the Wyre Forest, in Worcestershire, England, and has been around for nearly 250 million years, being periodically inhabited over the past 800 years. This gem is hidden, private, and Mastropietro even fitted it with modern-necessities like WIFI. The clash between old and new is really something that makes this cave such a special place. WIFI is not the only luxury this cave has been fitted with, it also includes some top-notch appliances and heated floors.

The extravagant amenities and home took over 1000 hours to complete and according to The Daily Mail, £160,000 to perfect. If that isn’t enough, to start the project Mastropietro had to clear 70-80 tonnes of stone—one HUGE task. The British tonne is equivalent to an American metric ton, or 2,000 kilograms; that’s between 140,000-160,000 kilograms. The hard work Mastropietro put in to create this magnificent hidden home despite his diagnosis is admirable and inspiring. The pictures included in the next slides show every detail of this tiny, blissful home.

But there’s more—you can rent this romantic spot out for £195 a night. The cave sits on 3 private acres and is known for its tranquillity and relaxed ambience. The minimum stay is two nights but if you work scheduling out, you can go off the grid for up to a month in this private getaway. The slideshow will provide pictures of the process and the final project so you get to see how it was transformed.

 

14. The Beginning

thelittlethings.com

thelittlethings.com

The cave has been periodically inhabited over the last 800 years, but by no means has it ever been the masterpiece it is today. Clearing through over 70-80 tonnes of Jurassic sandstone (pretty dang old)  had to be done in order to start this project, and as you can see the beginning looks like a pretty bare-boned cave. The project was daunting and gave Mastropietro an outlet to handle the troubling news of his MS diagnosis.



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