Chilling Last Words

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Leaving behind a legacy of chaos, murder, and mystery, cult leader Charles Manson died in November 2017. However, before he died he left behind one final message that is absolutely chilling. “The dead but never die.” Believing that he would one day return to continue his reign of terror, his final words let us into the mind of a man who was a pure psychopath.

The Face of Evil

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Considering himself a spiritual demagogue, Manson based his teachings off of Scientology and the Process Church of the Final Judgement. One thing that Manson believed was that Satan and Christ would one day reunite to judge mankind in the final days. He saw the United States and the government as the modern-day Ancient Rome and believed himself to be the reincarnation of Christ.

Reign of Terror

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Of course, this self-description couldn’t be further from the truth. Charles Manson was more like the anti-Christ who had a toxic influence on pop culture during the 1960’s waiting for an apocalypse that never came. The nine brutal murders that were committed by his followers also shook the nation to its very core, shattering Manson’s façade of peace and love.

A Troubled Young Man

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Manson’s psychiatric health came into question long before the infamous murders. As a young man, he fell in with the wrong crowd and robbed several filling stations back in 1951. He even stole a car and drove it over state lines which resulted in Manson going to prison for the first time. Unfortunately, this was just the beginning of a long list of crimes for the so-called cult leader.

First Marriage

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At first, Manson was committed to a minimum-security facility, but over the course of a few months he committed over eight disciplinary offenses, three were considered homosexual acts, and another was assault on a young boy. During his time in prison, he met and married a hospital waitress named Rosalie Jean Willis. She would go on to give birth to their son, but due to his increasingly violent behavior, she filed for divorce in 1958.

Spiritual Guru

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It was in 1967 when Manson was released from his latest prison stint that he transformed himself from criminal to the role of spiritual “guru.” Using the San Francisco as the headquarters for his new cult in the hippy district of Haight-Ashbury, it would be known as the “Manson Family.”

Helter Skelter is Born

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In 1968, Manson established his cult’s base at the Spahn’s Movie Ranch in Los Angeles and began developing his theories on racial war. He code-named it “Helter Skelter” and by February of 1969 Manson began predicting the total destruction of American society. Yet despite the grim outlook, he believed the “Manson Family” would survive and prosper in a city underneath California’s Death Valley. Manson certainly had a vivid imagination, right?

Summer of ’69

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It would be in the later summer of 1969 that Manson would instigate his plan and commit a series of murders in upscale white neighborhoods in LA. His goal was for the killings to be blamed on African Americans. One of the most notorious murders happened on August 8, 1969 when four of his followers killed actress Sharon Tate, the pregnant wife of film director Roman Polanski.

The Murders Continue

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Manson continued the vicious murder spree the next night by killing supermarket chain boss Leno LaBianca and his wife. Manson claims he left before they were harmed, but he did instruct six of his followers to kill them. The victims were stabbed and had the words “War” and “Death to Pigs” carved into their bodies.

Finally Apprehended

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Manson and his “family” would soon be apprehended by the police. This included, Susan Atkins, Patricia Krenwinkel, Charles Watson, Linda Kasabian, Leslie Van Houten and Steve Grogan. They were put on trial in June of 1970, but Kasabian was able to get immunity in exchange for eye witness testimony, revealing she had not taken direct part in the killings.

A Comedy of Errors Trial

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The trial under Judge Charles Older was a complete nightmare from start to finish. Manson appeared in court with a carved “X” on his forehead that he later changed to a Nazi swastika and at one point attempted to attack the judge. The other members of the Manson Family also maintained a presence in and outside of the courthouse. Overall, it was an intimidating affair.

Convicted and Sentenced

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On April 19, 1971 the Manson Family and its members would be found guilty on all 27 counts. They were ordered to be given the death penalty, but due to the state abolishing capital punishment, the sentences were commuted to life in prison. Manson remained behind bars until his death in 1971.

Still a Troublemaker

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Even though he was in prison, Manson continued to cause trouble throughout his entire stay. He racked up over 100 prison violations and was attacked by other prisoners on more than one occasion. Manson also spent most of his free time creating voodoo dolls of his enemies and sticking pins into them.

A Final Call

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Although Manson was serving a life sentence, he still kept ties to the outside world. On November 12, 2017 he reached out to his old friend Ben Gurecki who maintains a YouTube Channel dedicated to Manson. It would be Manson’s final phone call and what he said would be disturbing to say the least.

The Last Words of a Killer

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Mason told Gurecki the following…

“Gone in the sky the dead but never die. Not yet found just a dream of hearsay. Who’s, what’s, why’s, for what? We each can make up our own dreams with the story line as soon as we are no where we can change. As soon as I get up, out, around me will become a team. The beast, a priest, midnight and not as much as all.”

A Poetic Proclamation

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Before the prison authorities cut off the call. Manson had one last thing to say…

“Nothing with everyone and everything over and gone to start backwards again and again to nowhere and nothing again. To where you know it all as forever and some more, nothing again to where you know it all as forever and some more. Love for all. You are or could maybe and more. Not at…”

Gibberish or an Omen?

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Confused? Don’t worry, most people were. While what he said was pretty much incomprehensible, Manson’s final words did emphasize themes of reincarnation and immortality. According to his friend Gurecki, Manson had no fear of dying and believed he would walk the earth once more as a scorpion or crow.

The Human Behind the Killer

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“People don’t realize Manson was a real human being,” Gurecki stated in one of his YouTube videos. “This transcript shows him talking to a friend of 23 years in a very personal moment, knowing something’s not right with him. The whole conversation was him just talking like normal and rambling, but the last 60 seconds is quite profound I think. I believe in retrospect he was talking about his own demise.”

The End

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Only two days after his call with Gurecki, Manson would be taken to the hospital suffering from colon cancer. His health had been in decline for months and he finally died on November 19th from cardiac arrest and respiratory failure. To the end, Manson was not ashamed for his actions.

Famous for the Wrong Reasons

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In the documentary Charles Manson: The Final Words, the filmmakers replayed phone calls that were recorded over the last year of Manson’s life. Manson revealed he was not only the most famous human being to be alive, but to have ever lived. He also stated he spent much of his 40 years in confinement contemplating the crimes he committed.

Public Statement

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In the aftermath of Manson’s death, the Association of Deputy District Attorneys of California released the following public statement:

“Manson was an evil, sophisticated con-man with twisted and warped moral values. Manson’s victims are the ones who should be remembered and mourned on the occasion of his death…”

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